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Key words: social justice, social activism, empowerment, ethics, communication

The purpose of this lesson plan is to allow students to explore the content of the video Real Bright Ideas: Dance in more depth, contemplating the idea of social justice, social activism and the empowerment of young people. Students also begin to explore the idea of an ethical concept and work on the effective communication of complex ideas and subject matter.

Class grouping: Whole Class, Individual or Paired
Time: 60-90 minutes

See video transcript here.


Teacher Instructions


Activity: Flashcard Activism

 

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS:
  • Access to the internet
  • A3 card (6 pieces per student or pair)
  • Coloured markers
  • Smart phone or tablet (extension activity)
SOCIAL JUSTICE

noun [ mass noun ]
Justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within a
society: individuality gives way to the struggle for social justice.

Process

PART 1 Dance + social justice

After watching Rosie video ‘Real Bright Ideas: Dance’, give students two minutes to turn to a classmate to discuss the following question:

What has Kumari Middleton achieved with her dance company ‘Mayebuyi’ andwhy did she want to achieve it?

Ask students to share their ideas with the class. Try to ensure that the notion of ‘social justice’ is canvassed before moving on to step two of this activity (refer to definition above).

PART 2 Social Justice Issues

Below is a list of issues commonly understood to fall under the umbrella of social justice.

Individually or in pairs, ask students to choose an issue from the list below (or if time allows, provide the option of identifying an alternative issue). Students should choose a topic that they already have some knowledge about.

* Animal rights
* Gender equality
* Homelessness
* Access to health care
* Access to mental health services
* Environmental degradation
* Violence against women
* Aboriginal rights
* Treatment of people seeking asylum and refugees
* Disability rights
* LGBTQIA+ rights

PART 3 Reporting back

Ask students to come up with five short statements explaining something they already know about the issue they have chosen.

PART 4 Research

  • Next, ask students to come up with five short statements explaining something they don’t already know about the issue they have chosen. Students will require access to the internet to research these statements.
  • Students should be encouraged to consider their sources of information carefully, accessing a range of views and drawing informed conclusions based upon them.
  • They should also locate 2-3 websites that can provide further information to others about their chosen topic.

PART 5 Making flashcards

Show students the video made for Bob Dylan’s song ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’ . Ask students to make a series of their own double-sided flashcards.

On one side of the card they should write something they already know about their chosen issue, and on the other something they do not already know about their chosen issue. Their final flashcard should feature links that direct their audience to websites for further information.

For example:

I did know that violence against women in Australia was a significant problem.

I did not know that on average, at least one woman a week is killed by a partner or former partner.

PART 6 Sharing new ideas

Ask students to present their flash cards to the class. Allow time for discussion and feedback and for students to identify one piece of information that was new to them (from another student’s presentation).

Extension Activity:

Step 1. Ask students to illustrate each of their flashcards, using photos, drawings, emojis etc. Alternatively you might wish to provide the option of keeping the design of the cards simple.

Step 2: Assist students to choose a quiet and private space within their school environment to film their flashcard video using their phones, a school tablet etc. You might like to suggest that they try to avoid using any identifiable features (e.g. faces) when filming.

Step 3. Ask your students to share their flashcard videos with their classmates. Consider also sharing your students’ work with the broader school community via assemblies, school websites or other appropriate avenues.


 

Student Instructions


Activity: Flashcard Activism


Task:

After watching Rosie’s ‘Real Bright Ideas: Dance’ video, you are going to create a set of flashcards depicting what you know – and what you don’t know – about a social justice issue of your choice.

Instructions:

PART 1 Choose Your Issue

Individually or in a pair, choose a social justice issue from the list below. If you have an area of interest that isn’t on the list, you could ask your teacher if you could
focus on that instead. However, it is important that you choose a topic that you already have some knowledge about, even if it’s just basic knowledge.

* Animal rights
* Gender equality
* Homelessness
* Access to health care
* Access to mental health services
* Environmental degradation
* Violence against women
* Aboriginal rights
* Treatment of people seeking
asylum and refugees

PART 2 What do you know

Once you have chosen your area of interest, try to come up with five short statements that explain what you already know about the issue you have chosen.

PART 3 Research new info

Next, come up with five short statements that explain things you don’t already know about the issue you have chosen. You will need to research your topic thoroughly to come up with these statements. You also need to come up with addresses for 2-3 websites that can provide further information to others about your chosen topic.

Important note: make sure that you use a variety of sources for your information, and
try to access a range of different views about your topic.

PART 4 Watch

Watch the video for the Bob Dylan song ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’

PART 5 Making flashcards

  1. Make a series of your own double-sided flashcards, like the ones Dylan uses.
  2. On one side of the card you write something you already know about your chosen issue.
  3. On the other write something you do not already know about your chosen issue.
  4. On the final flashcard write some links that direct your audience to websites for further information.For example:I did know that violence against women in Australia was a significant problem.I did not know that on average, at least one woman a week is killed by a partner or former partner.

PART 6 Sharing new ideas

After you have finished all of your flashcards, present them to the class.

Extension Activity:

Step 1. llustrate each of your flashcards, using photos, drawings, emojis etc. Alternatively you might wish to keep the design of the cards simple.

Step 2. Ask your teacher to help you to find a quiet space to film your flashcard video using your phone, a school tablet, an iPad etc. Avoid using any identifiable features of yourself or other students (e.g. faces) when filming.

Step 3. Share your flashcard video with your classmates! You might also like to share your work with your broader school community via assemblies, school websites or other appropriate avenues.


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