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We’re all about respect for your body and mind, in your relationships, at work, and for the world we live in.


Rosie is a unique online space where young women can connect with the best digital resources out there, helping them to navigate life’s tricky situations. 

The internet can be a minefield , often providing misleading or even harmful information. It is so important that everyone has access to avenues of communication which reinforces their self-worth and resilience, while increasing their knowledge and understanding of their bodies, minds, relationships, work and world. 

Rosie includes a range of resources, links, videos, articles, blogs, teacher resources and support networks.

Meet Team Rosie

Rosie was initially set up by project workers Georgie and Ally, and is now run by Maddy and Ally with the assistance of expert staff, volunteers and of course, teenage girls.

Ally Oliver-Perham (left) and Maddy Crehan (right)

Maddy Crehan

Maddy has been working at the Victorian Women’s Trust, primarily on the Rosie project, since July 2015. She regularly writes for the Rosie blog, is the editor of Write Like a Girl, manages Rosie social media and is involved in the overall strategic planning of the project. Maddy is passionate about music, history, art, writing, and advocating for women and girls. She also has a slight obsession with GIFs (hence the animated Rosie blogs…)

Ally Oliver-Perham

Ally is the Manager of Strategic Communications at the Victorian Women’s Trust. In 2014, Ally co-founded Rosie with Georgie Proud. She has been overseeing the project for many years. Ally believes that gender equality is at the heart of positive social change (she also believes in the healing power of choc tops but that’s a whole other thing).

Why Rosie?

We are inspired by the iconic Rosie the Riveter image which represented all the women that went to work in factories during World War II in the USA. Traditionally women were not allowed to work in such roles, if at all. These women paved the way for future generations to enter the workforce in whatever field they chose. The image has become a symbol of women’s empowerment globally, proving that women can achieve anything they set their minds to!

Did we miss something? Let us know!

We want Rosie to have all the info a girl could need but we know our site isn’t exhaustive, and that there’s heaps of stuff we’ve yet to explore. So if you think we need more info on a certain topic, get in touch! We’d love to hear from you. Drop us a line at hello@rosierespect.org.au – thanks!

And if you’re really passionate about a topic, why not write something about it for Rosie!

Read more about contributing to Rosie here.